Rates of liver disease soar in England

Rates of liver disease soar in EnglandAccording to new NHS figures, death rates from liver disease have risen to record levels, increasing by a quarter in less than a decade.

The report in question was undertaken by the National End of Life Care Intelligence Network and revealed that the number of deaths caused by liver disease in England has risen from 9,231 in 2001 to 11,525 in 2009 – with heavy drinking and higher obesity levels thought to be partly responsible.

It was revealed that whilst some major causes of liver disease such as heart disease are gradually declining, preventable contributory factors such as high alcohol consumption and obesity are on the increase.

According to a spokesperson from the Department of Health, these figures are a reminder of the serious damage that can be inflicted by both eating and drinking too much, and urgent action is needed to halt this growing trend.

Speaking on behalf of the British Liver Trust, chief executive Andrew Langford said: “This report clearly highlights that liver patients have been, and continue to be, failed by our healthcare system.

“Liver disease has remained the poor relation in comparison to other big killers such as cancer and heart disease, yet liver disease is the only big killer on the rise.”

It is a well-known fact that excess weight and excessive alcohol consumption can contribute to increasing the risk of numerous serious diseases and health concerns, including liver disease.

If you are overweight or you feel that your health is currently being affected by your lifestyle and food choices then you may benefit from seeking some external help and support.

There are a variety of alternative and complementary therapies that are intended to boost your health and your overall sense of well-being, whilst others are said to assist in the promotion of healthy weight loss.

For more information about the various complementary and alternative therapies on offer, please see our Therapy Topics section and browse our selection of fact-sheets to find out more.

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